The New York Strip steak is more than a steak house favorite. This classic cut of beef was also the steak cut favored by the First Lady of Steaks, our founder Ruth Fertel. Whether on or off the bone, the New York Strip provides a full-flavored and tender steak experience.

What is a New York Strip Steak?

 

Well marbled, full bodied and rich with beefy flavor, a New York Strip is firm and tender when it comes to texture, flavor and fat. Cut from the shorter side of the beef loin, the muscles in this area do little work, and that spells tenderness every time. At Ruth’s, ours is a USDA Prime cut of short loin that can be enjoyed as a 16oz boneless strip steak or as a 19oz bone-in specialty cut (Ruth’s favorite!).

History of the New York Strip Steak

Ask where nearly any cut of beef gets its name and get ready for a spirited
discussion. When it comes to the Strip Steak, some credit Swiss brothers
Giovanni and Pietro Delmonico, and their namesake 1827 New York restaurant.

Originally known as the Kansas City Strip Steak, the brothers began serving theirs boneless at the request of some patrons, turning this prized Midwest beef cut into what they felt was a more refined cut for their fine dining clientele. This short loin cut without the bone became their New York Strip.

perfect new York strip steak

THE BONE-IN NEW YORK STRIP

It’s hard to beat a bone-in steak, and the New York Strip is no exception. As the bone cooks at high temperatures – say, in a 1800 degree broiler – the bone and its marrow infuse the meat with extra flavor. Our USDA Prime 19-ounce Bone-in New York Strip Steak is one of three specialty cuts on our menu, with a 16-ounce boneless New York Strip also available.

New York Strip Steak vs Kansas City Strip Steak 

So is a Kansas City Strip really just a bone-in version of its New York cousin? While there may be some truth to it having started out that way, today these two types of steaks are essentially one and the same. Whether they’re bone-in or boneless often depends on the butcher or the steak house. While a Strip Steak may be served with or without the small strip of fat that helps give it its prized flavor, you’ll find this more consistently on the KC Strip.

COOKING A NEW YORK STRIP STEAK TO PERFECTION

Ruth’s favorite strip was a medium rare steak, charred – though we’ll prepare yours however you prefer. Slightly firmer than a Ribeye but with less marbling, a medium rare steak preparation after our proprietary aging process and simple seasoning brings out the rich, beefy flavor of this Prime cut. If you’re preparing at home, we recommend using a cast iron skillet or grill, giving both sides a nice char, then cooking to your desired doneness. Remember that steaks will continue to cook for a few minutes after they’re removed from the heat, so let it rest for 5 minutes or so before serving.

preparing a new York strip steak

Other names for a New York Strip Steak include:

New York Steak
Ambassador Steak
Boneless Club Steak
Hotel-Style Steak
 Kansas City Steak or KC Strip
 Top Loin
 Shell Steak
 Boneless Sirloin Delmonico
 Veiny Steak

Best Wine Pairing for New York Strip Steaks

A New York Strip Steak can be enjoyed with a wide variety of wines because of its balance of tenderness and texture. Higher tannin red wines like a young Cabernet Sauvignon or Bordeaux are best enjoyed with full bodied steaks like the New York Strip, since they actually work together to make both more enjoyable. Tannins soften as they bind with the fat of the Strip, while the wine’s acid helps cut the fat in the meat. 

Of course wine pairing is equal parts art, science and taste preference. With so many vineyards and vintages on Ruth’s award-winning wine list, exploring them is part of the experience of enjoying a world class steak.
 
Cabernet Sauvignon. A younger, more tannic Cabernet Sauvignon is a favorite pairing for this type of steak. A Cab that is too “big” or has higher alcohol content can overpower the meat and shadow its flavor. The peppery aroma notable to most Cabs is also a nice complement to the understated salt and pepper seasoning we use for our USDA Prime steak cuts.

Bordeaux. The vineyards and chateaus in the Bordeaux region of France produce exceptional wines for pairing with full flavored steak cuts like the New York Strip. Today a Left Bank Bordeaux has more Cabernet Sauvignon, while Right Bank regions, where the soil and climate are different, produce more Merlot-based wines. 

Malbec. Here’s where the balance of texture and tenderness in this versatile steak lets Strip lovers explore so many wonderful pairing choices. With softer tannins than a Cab or Bordeaux, a Malbec makes a nice wine pairing for a New York Strip Steak that has been expertly aged and cooked to perfection.
 

 

 

Glass of Cabernet Sauvignon

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